Psychology of dating sites

Although the authors find that online dating sites offer a distinctly different experience than conventional dating, the superiority of these sites is not as evident.

Reis (University of Rochester), and Susan Sprecher (Illinois State University) take a comprehensive look at the access, communication, and matching services provided by online dating sites.

Last November 2013 I saw his profile on a dating site.

The authors’ overarching assessment of online dating sites is that scientifically, they just don’t measure up.

Read the Full Text Many of us enter the dating pool looking for that special someone, but finding a romantic partner can be difficult. Dating sites provide access to more potential partners than do traditional dating methods, but the act of browsing and comparing large numbers of profiles can lead individuals to commoditize potential partners and can reduce their willingness to commit to any one person.

With the rise of the digital age, it is no surprise that people have flocked to the Internet as a way to take control of their dating lives and find their “soul-mate.” But is online dating essentially different than conventional dating, and does it promote better romantic outcomes? Communicating online can foster intimacy and affection between strangers, but it can also lead to unrealistic expectations and disappointment when potential partners meet in real life.

Having fallen under this spell myself…”Oh, he’s nice but I’m sure there’s something better on the next page…” Click.

Applicants will be judged based on academic achievement (minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA) and a minimum 500- to maximum 900-word essay entitled “The Psychology of Online Dating.” The essay should address the psychological issues and challenges facing singles given the growing popularity of online dating and how relationship professionals can help online daters navigate these challenges.

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